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tonebloke
2011-07-23, 08:47 AM
I recorded a show that needs some work done to it. As you can see in the graphic there are some spikes through the whole recording that I'd like to remove but don't know how.
I'm using CEP2 but don't know how to "edit" these things out.

Can someone either point me to a guide to doing so, or, just explain how to do it (and where in CEP2 I find the correct "dropbox or tab").


FWIW: These spikes are loud crowd cheering between numbers.

Thanks for any help. :)

rspencer
2011-07-23, 10:56 AM
Don't use CEP2, so can't give specifics.

Either go through the show & lower the volume of each spike manually (what I would do), or use compression to drop the spikes to the level of everything else.

AAR.oner
2011-07-24, 04:21 AM
go through the show & lower the volume of each spike manually (what I would do)

same here

dcbullet
2011-07-24, 11:56 AM
audacity has something called an "envelope" that I use to lower audience cheering like that in a gradual way. That way, you don't have an audible drop in volume. CEP probably has something similar.

Like rspencer and aaroner, I do it manually for every single spike.

Have fun!

paddington
2011-07-24, 12:35 PM
I recorded a show that needs some work done to it. As you can see in the graphic there are some spikes through the whole recording that I'd like to remove but don't know how.
I'm using CEP2 but don't know how to "edit" these things out.

Can someone either point me to a guide to doing so, or, just explain how to do it (and where in CEP2 I find the correct "dropbox or tab").


FWIW: These spikes are loud crowd cheering between numbers.

Thanks for any help. :)


I'll just echo the advice given, but with specifics for CEP...

The "envelope" filter is there, and you can also use "hard limiting" or "normalize" for this. You'll want to try each on a few peaks (undo between trials) to se what works best and yields the most natural, unnoticeable results.

All three are located under Effects > Amplitude in the top menu bar (and there are buttons).


I also do these peaks one at a time, usually buy zooming to the peak and using the limiter (effects > amplitude > hard limiting - or use the button if you have the button bars turned on) with the limiting set to the avg level of the audio around it. Basically, you are a manual peak limiter.

Highlight the peak (just roughly) and use the "zoom to selection" button (bottom left of the zooming buttons). Then highlight it more precisely to apply the filter to the proper area. The selection should start just where the peak begins to rise above the normal audio around it so you don't end up with little dips to each side when you limit.

In your case, the audio around it is peaking around -4 db or so, so maybe try that as the limiter's limit for starters (or use normalize or envelope, depending on what sounds best).

your peaks are fairly uniform, so just experiment with the limiter on one of them until you get the desired reduction, while maintaining a natural sound when you play over it. Then do the rest with the same settings.

keep in mind, these sounds are peaks in your recording, so they should remain just a bit higher than the surrounding audio to avoid being noticeable during playback.

if the limiter does produce the desire results you can try doing the same procedure with the "normalize" instead... again, set it to bring the peaks dow to the avg level of the rest of the audio, or just a bit higher.

tonebloke
2011-07-25, 02:48 AM
Thanks for the imput guys. Looks like I'm gonna have to sit through a few hours of filtering. Should be interesting. :thumbsup :wave:

P A U L
2011-07-25, 02:56 AM
If they are claps, you can use a click reduction, like Click Repair (DeClick):

http://www.clickrepair.net/

that does a really good job of removing record pops. Single hand claps are so similar that it works well on those too. It is adjustable, so if it messes too much with the audio, you can lower it, until it reduces the claps & not affect the frequencies overall...

If you're talking about screams/whistles, well, there's nothing but manually selecting each scream/whistle, & either limiting it, or lowering the volume & then listening back & forth, to make sure you didn't get it sounding artificial...

Click Repair has a free trial period, so if you want to play with it, try it out. It's not too expensive if you find it to do what you want. I used it to clean up a recording that had thousands of singular handclaps & it cleaned them up nicely with out any noticeable side-effects...