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View Full Version : Making a matrix?


PG1Tapes
2011-04-25, 08:31 PM
How do I make a matrix...any advice?

co9ol
2011-04-25, 08:50 PM
do you plan to do the mixing live or is this a after the fact thing?

also what kinda sources are you mixing? (aka SBD, AUD etc)

PG1Tapes
2011-04-25, 09:18 PM
do you plan to do the mixing live or is this a after the fact thing?

also what kinda sources are you mixing? (aka SBD, AUD etc)

This is an after the fact kind of thing, I'm trying to fix an incomplete source that I have.

I'm trying to mix two AUDs.

co9ol
2011-04-25, 10:28 PM
Well there are many different ways to do a matrix it mostly depends on how you want to mix them and what program your using. If both sources are analogue then changing the speed can be a good way to match them together(or time stretch and then pitch correct later). But if they are both digital time stretching is the way to go as there should be no difference in pitch.

So what program are you going to use?

Also a note is mixing, play them to their strengths. If one source has mostly bass guitar in it then you can afford to eq some of the low end out of the other source.

PG1Tapes
2011-04-25, 10:46 PM
What program would you recommend that I use? At the moment, all I really have is Audacity, and I use Kristal Audio Engine sometimes as well. But if you have a better idea, please tell me.

Also, could I just patch in the other source where my source cuts out? Or would that sound bad?

Audioarchivist
2011-04-26, 01:27 AM
What program would you recommend that I use? At the moment, all I really have is Audacity, and I use Kristal Audio Engine sometimes as well. But if you have a better idea, please tell me.

Also, could I just patch in the other source where my source cuts out? Or would that sound bad?

Well, if both sources are incomplete anyway, the "matrix" part will only be for where both sources overlap, right?

Are they analog sources, or digital? Analog (tape based, etc.) are notorious for speeds drifting, making phasing and flanging that are very time consuming to properly time match. I mean, we're talking hundreds of small edits per minute done manually to make them synchronized right - maybe. If they're analog, I'd just patch one with the other, but I'd crossfade the edits rather than have them cut hard from source A to source B.

I've always used Cubase VST5.1 for any multi-source mixing I've done - not because it's better than anything else, but it's what I trained on and am most familiar with. Adobe Audition (Cool Edit Pro) can do it too I think. Vegas? Protools? Will the freebie Audacity work for it?

Maybe consider doing the crossfaded patch idea, and also releasing both sources at the same time by themselves? Just a thought...

co9ol
2011-04-26, 05:43 AM
what Audioarchivist said!

Audacity isn't all that bad... but there are better programs out there that you can get your hands on. I use Protools and it works quite well for matrixing but that is also what I was trained on. I also know a lot of people that use Cubase and Adobie Audition. If you don't do it for this matrix, I'd look in to downloading some free trials and checking them out.
Audacity is great for most peoples needs but I've found that Protools makes this stuff 10x easier (once you get to know the program)

PG1Tapes
2011-04-26, 06:56 AM
Well, if both sources are incomplete anyway, the "matrix" part will only be for where both sources overlap, right?

Are they analog sources, or digital? Analog (tape based, etc.) are notorious for speeds drifting, making phasing and flanging that are very time consuming to properly time match. I mean, we're talking hundreds of small edits per minute done manually to make them synchronized right - maybe. If they're analog, I'd just patch one with the other, but I'd crossfade the edits rather than have them cut hard from source A to source B.

I've always used Cubase VST5.1 for any multi-source mixing I've done - not because it's better than anything else, but it's what I trained on and am most familiar with. Adobe Audition (Cool Edit Pro) can do it too I think. Vegas? Protools? Will the freebie Audacity work for it?

Maybe consider doing the crossfaded patch idea, and also releasing both sources at the same time by themselves? Just a thought...

They're both digital sources. One of which is complete, and one of which is incomplete. I'll check out Cubase, but I don't have a lot of money to spare at the moment. Doing a crossfaded patch sounds much more fit to my abilities though.

what Audioarchivist said!

Audacity isn't all that bad... but there are better programs out there that you can get your hands on. I use Protools and it works quite well for matrixing but that is also what I was trained on. I also know a lot of people that use Cubase and Adobie Audition. If you don't do it for this matrix, I'd look in to downloading some free trials and checking them out.
Audacity is great for most peoples needs but I've found that Protools makes this stuff 10x easier (once you get to know the program)

I've used Audition before and I loved it!! I used it back a few years ago for re mastering some tapes and it took out all of the hissing and humming really easy. I've also heard a lot of good things about Protools, so I might consider getting a trial of that once I free up some hard drive space.

LeifH12345
2012-07-24, 07:42 PM
Are they analog sources, or digital? Analog (tape based, etc.) are notorious for speeds drifting, making phasing and flanging that are very time consuming to properly time match. I mean, we're talking hundreds of small edits per minute done manually to make them synchronized right - maybe.



So is there a particular program that will make this process easier - something that goes to a point of a percent for adjusting speed/pitch?

I'm attempting to mix 2 analog tracks to a digital video (2 songs only). So far I can't get more than 10 seconds at a time to match up.

Audioarchivist
2012-07-24, 08:22 PM
So is there a particular program that will make this process easier - something that goes to a point of a percent for adjusting speed/pitch?

I'm attempting to mix 2 analog tracks to a digital video (2 songs only). So far I can't get more than 10 seconds at a time to match up.

Recently I've been doing some multi-source mixes in Sony Vegas 8 - things that were digital, but obviously one machine's time base was way off. It seems easy (relatively) to just be able to drag and drop, and then grab an end of what I think was the wrong time based file and literally stretch it to match the correct one. Way easier than old attempts to do this in Cubase, using Wavelab to pitch / speed bend a file by guessed percentages and re-importing to Cubase to see if I had guessed right. Used to be many many failed guesses before I zoned in on the right settings. Seems like child's play by comparison to just grab an end of one of the two files and pull it longer or push it shorter...

So, try Vegas. I believe it's an ALT - click at the end of the file in the multitrack display (and hold!) to do stretch bend stuff. Good luck!

LeifH12345
2012-07-24, 09:52 PM
Thanks John I'll give it a try

AAR.oner
2012-07-25, 07:29 AM
imo Ableton Live is hands down the best tool for time stretching [Warping], especially when dealing with analogue sources where you've got constantly fluctuating tape speeds

LeifH12345
2012-07-25, 05:50 PM
I'll try Ableton Live as well Aaron. Haven't had any time to play with the programs yet though

lpmaskman
2012-07-27, 11:42 AM
Ableton is a very great program for time-stretching without changing pitch. Actually I haven't made any matrixes yet, I use that app for music making.

Unidecker
2012-07-27, 01:51 PM
Vegas is just as EASY .... ctrl and drag the audio to stretch or shrink to exact wav. then render loop region and done...

uni-fi
2012-07-27, 08:42 PM
Bingo...Ive only used multiple sources a couple of times, but I always did it in Vegas and it was really simple.