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View Full Version : What computer hardware/software to use to get cassete to computer?


mauserman
2009-01-03, 03:32 PM
Hey Gang, Mauserman here.
New in this forum and wondering if ya'll could help me out?
I have maybe 1000 or so shows of all kinds l've collected
my whole life. l also have a mint Nak Dragon. Just not positive
whats the best way to get cassette to digital? l know l need a
"capture card", of some sort, just not sure what to buy?
There is probobaly some good software, etc. l need also.
l'm fairly computer savy, and l think l have pretty damn good
taste in music. So should be able to contribute here with
a little help from my friends! In any case, it's good to have found
this site and looking forward to hearing a response to my questions!
:dance:

U2Lynne
2009-01-03, 04:02 PM
You might want to modify your thread title to include the words "transfer to computer from cassette" or something like that. It may capture the eye of people who have done that better.

paperface
2009-01-03, 05:36 PM
5.05 GB/30.02 MB/0.01 :wtf:
Definitely not the best quality but I use a $7 "audio dubbing cable" from Radio Shack. I plug one end into the headphone jack on my tape player and the other into the mic jack on my computer. Then I record on Audacity and hit play on my tape recorder. :cool:
Of course, this is the ghetto way to do it. There is much more expensive dedicated equipment out there for quality captures.

mauserman
2009-01-03, 06:45 PM
Hey Thanx,
l already got that one figured out.
l was looking for away to make a
"high quality" recording of my cassettes.
l know that on some of my recordings,
l would want to turn the volume up at least.
Others could use some more bass, and maybe
the "flip" deleted when recording to CD.
l know they make cards with software included for
this purpose, just not sure wich way to go?
Would most likley want to have an EQ also.

Thank You for your reply,
and good luck in the new year!

BjEoThAn
2009-01-03, 07:23 PM
I am by no way experienced at this but some Google searching provided me with multiple results all about the same.

What I dont know is if there is any benefit to passing the incoming audio through a preamp or other stereo equipment before going onto the PC and Audacity software.

I would assume? there may be slight advantage playing back the tape on a "Nice" audio cassette deck

I have not used Audacity but I presume there is a way to clean up the "hiss" of cassettes within it, or other software.

here are some links that i liked from my search results.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/40499-6-cassette-digital-transfer
http://lifehacker.com/software/mp3/alpha-geek-how-to-digitize-cassette-tapes-222394.php
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-10163_7-6226087-1.html
http://www.andybrain.com/archive/convert-cassette-to-cd-digital.htm

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_can_you_convert_audio_cassette_tapes_to_digital_files

BjEoThAn
2009-01-03, 07:35 PM
umm yeah use the Nakamichi Dragon, unless theres a better option?

mauserman
2009-01-03, 09:59 PM
Thanx for the links.
Just not what l'm after.
looking for high quality
hardware and software.
Free is great, but l don't
mind to spend money on
something l want and need.

Five
2009-01-03, 10:15 PM
audacity (free software) will perform perfectly well and for soundcard something like m-audio audiophile 2496 will give excellent results for about $120.

with audacity the only tricky bit is to set the bit depth and sample rate in the preferences before you start (should be 16bit/44.1kHz unless you want to get fancy and go 24bit), then you set levels using windows mixer (normally available in the tray, lower-right) to avoid clipping. unless you really know what you're doing and have proper monitors its best to avoid eq and stuff, even if you do know what you're doing its best to keep a raw copy on file (take it from me, I've made mistakes overeqing and throwing away raw copies years back...).

I don't have experience with a high end deck like the nak dragon, but one thing I heard about that one is that it is a good idea to get an auto-azimuth kill switch mod done. the deck is brilliant the way it automatically finds the correct azimuth, but once it finds the setting you can't stop it from adjusting and re-adjusting during playback, which is annoying...

mauserman
2009-01-03, 10:57 PM
Thank you "Five",
Will look into the soundcard you mentioned,
and already have Audacity. (Just need to play
with it a little more). Still interested in an EQ,
and curious about your auto azumith suggestion.
Thank you for your reply.

GRC
2009-01-04, 06:55 AM
Is the 'final destination' for the audio the computer, or are you looking to archive the cassettes to CD using the computer? Alternatively, are you looking to archive them to a hard drive, either in the computer, or an outboard unit?

If what you really want is to archive the cassettes to CD, whether at 44.1kHz 16-bit, or 96kHz 24-bit, then forget the computer, capture cards, software etc and buy one of these; Alesis Masterlink ML9600 (http://www.alesis.com/masterlink)

GRC
2009-01-04, 07:44 AM
Feed RCA out from cassette deck to RCA in on the Masterlink, and press 'record' on Masterlink, 'play' on cassette deck. No messing around with picking a soundcard, no hunting for software, no installation woes, no need to sit in front of the computer screen, you can put the Masterlink into the HiFi setup and keep the noise of the computer with its fans and HDDs in a separate room.

Masterlink will EQ for you, adjust level, split tracks, apply fades, and, if you want, apply compression and/or limiting if needed.

Google 'masterlink+vinyl' to see forums where people discuss it for archiving their vinyl collections.

Clipping has never been an issue for me; I've used a variety of inputs to it; cassette, tape out from amplifier, reel-to-reel deck, tuner. As long as your cassettes aren't ridiculously overloaded to start with, you'll be fine.....

mauserman
2009-01-04, 09:08 AM
Thanx GRC!
l think l may have found just what l need!
Will do some discovery, and get back.
l really appreciate your reply.

mauserman

GRC
2009-01-04, 01:16 PM
I've only seen two professional units that will do what the Alesis does - the other is a Tascam unit that costs twice as much.

zeek
2009-01-05, 08:43 AM
For transferring I go from a nakamichi CR-5A to a tascam HD-P2.

If you haven't had your deck serviced in a long time, I would get it gone over before you really get into it, jsut to bring it back to spec and get the rubbers changed and moving parts lubed. (try willy herman for nak repair, he's pretty reasonable and a lot quicker than esl labs http://www.willyhermannservices.com/index.htm)

My preference is to stay away from PC sound cards for capture, unless your willing to drop 7 or 800 on a card. if you are, the lynx 2 cards are as good as you can get for A/D Conversion. You also want to have a ton of ram if you go this route and not oppen any processes while your transferring (or you get artifacts in your capture)

The hD-P2 has a great A/D Converter and can be used for a field recorder as well. My next purchase will be one of these

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Korg-MR1?sku=700878&src=3WWRWXGB&ZYXSEM=0

it has a great A/D, is cheaper than the tascam, and records in 1 bit DSD which is really as the best you can get. The 1bit files pull more into your transfer(and provide the highest possible bit rate for archiving). The 1 bit files are then dithered to 24/96 wave to work with. If you are going to do any post processing, it should be in 24/96. These units also double as a great bit bit bucket but require good pre and mics to get a good field recording.

I use wavelab and UAD cards/plugs for all my editing. I like the features and the layout of wavelab better than the others. It also will capture your transfer as well if you go with an onboard card. For wavelab plugins, I like the nomad and URS stuff. Do some googling and I'm sure you can find a try before you buy for all the above programs :)

And with Hiss, unless it's so loud it sounds like another member of the band, don't do too much with it. It will end up being more destructive than the hiss was.

I don't know much about Alesis Masterlink ML9600. Alesis makes solid stuff. on some sources I sit for 8 hrs listening to a song and tweaking EQ .5 db to get just the right balance and I have to see the meters while I'm doing it. If your really serious about getting the most from your tapes, you'll have to crossfade tape flips and patch drop outs ect in post processing still even if you EQ on the alesis. I think I would rather cut the onboard EQ out and do it all in one fell sweep in post processing, but thats just my preference. :)

direwolf-pgh
2009-01-05, 10:27 AM
plug the deck into your computer - or hire a pro to do it. holy overkill

example of pricing: http://www.allusionstudios.com/prices.shtml

GRC
2009-01-05, 10:28 AM
... I don't know much about Alesis Masterlink ML9600. Alesis makes solid stuff. on some sources I sit for 8 hrs listening to a song and tweaking EQ .5 db to get just the right balance and I have to see the meters while I'm doing it. If your really serious about getting the most from your tapes, you'll have to crossfade tape flips and patch drop outs ect in post processing still even if you EQ on the alesis. I think I would rather cut the onboard EQ out and do it all in one fell sweep in post processing, but thats just my preference. :)

I'm not sure what point you're making in the first instance; the Alesis has meters. When tweaking the EQ, the Alesis allows you to switch it in and out whilst monitoring to judge the effect, as can be done with any of the other signal processing features.

The only thing it doesn't do is a crossfade between two separate tracks - you can fade each of them to silence, join them to each other (with or without fades), crop them, but you can't superimpose the fade-out of one onto the fade-in of the next. Drop-outs are easy to crop out.

I find the front panel controls of the Alesis to be far more intuitive and user-friendly than, for instance, the Audacity interface. Operations which are a press of two buttons on the Alesis require selection, menu, drag etc with the mouse, and seem to be far more cumbersome on the PC.

zeek
2009-01-05, 11:04 AM
I'm not saying what your using is bad or wrong, but for the degree of editing I do, I couldn't make due with what the alesis has to offer

I'm working on a show right now and there are a few, maybe 4 instances where the volume spikes intensly. There are multiple left and right channel dropouts that need spliced/patched, and I have to crossfade 4 tape flips. It needs a good eq, some light compression, and the stereo image needs centered and widened. With all of these, I used a phase scope, and FFT meter, and a spectral meter in the audio montage utility of wavelab. I fix in montage, set my plugs, do one render and it's totally cleaned up. I also have the luxury of the undo button where your tweaks are in the transfer and permanent. If you don't like it after your done, your stuck doing another transfer. I can render and undo 10 times in the same time span it would take you to retransfer if I needed to with no ill effect to the files or tapes ect ect.

Not sure how using the alesis would be better (for me) than using a cheaper korg MR-1 that can double as a field recorder, and transfers in DSD coupled with wavelab and UAD cards for my needs.

If you want to d a down and dirty EQ then be done, the alesis looks great. I guess it just depends on what degree you want to go to. Just laying all the options on the table :)

mauserman
2009-01-05, 11:26 AM
Hey Direwolf,
As l stated in my first post, l have probobaly a 1000 or so cassettes to record.
l dont believe "sending them out to a pro", would be cost effective. l would also like to do some editing on my own. Some tapes have "filler", etc, l would like to delete, (or at least not have on my new recording). l have got some good advice here so far, and am very appreciative of the folks who have joined in this post! l suggest that rather than come here and take a big dump on all the fine people that have contributed here, that you simply just go read another post. Before l joined here, l was reading a post w/ freezer, and l think you also. lf l were the moderater here, l would have kicked you both off forever then and there. This forum is for people to exchange ideas/knowledge, not to blast one another. What part of "Trade", dont you get?

Anyways, no harm done. Please just move on.
mauserman

mauserman
2009-01-05, 11:38 AM
Well the Korg looks pretty damn cool! It could fill some of my other needs also!
However, after some discovery work, l learned that it has quite a few bugs. l do not mind to spend the money, just want something that works well. Anybody had any other experiences w/ the Korg? Or maybe something like it? Sure seems like a handy little item!

mauserman

zeek
2009-01-05, 11:46 AM
I know a lot of folks that use the MR-1000 and the results are wonderful as far as transfer quality, and live recording, but thats a bit bulky if your stealthing.

The M-1 is a lot smaller. I do know a few folks that have picked em up. What bugs are you referring too btw, just curious.

AAR.oner
2009-01-05, 11:51 AM
if yer looking for high quality, i'm not sure using the M-1 w/ its mini phone jack in's is yer best option...just my 2cents

mauserman
2009-01-05, 11:55 AM
Hey Zeek,
just for starters you can check this out about the Korg.
http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Korg-MR1?sku=700878&src=3WWRWXGB&ZYXSEM=0

direwolf-pgh
2009-01-05, 12:11 PM
Hey Direwolf,
As l stated in my first post, l have probobaly a 1000 or so cassettes to record.
l dont believe "sending them out to a pro", would be cost effective. l would also like to do some editing on my own. Some tapes have "filler", etc, l would like to delete, (or at least not have on my new recording). l have got some good advice here so far, and am very appreciative of the folks who have joined in this post! l suggest that rather than come here and take a big dump on all the fine people that have contributed here, that you simply just go read another post. Before l joined here, l was reading a post w/ freezer, and l think you also. lf l were the moderater here, l would have kicked you both off forever then and there. This forum is for people to exchange ideas/knowledge, not to blast one another. What part of "Trade", dont you get?

Anyways, no harm done. Please just move on.
mausermanI didnt take a dump in your thread.
either just hook up your tape deck or use a pro's services was my honest 2

why spend thousands when you're just going to hack at it anyway.
transfer > hack at it.. when you know what your doing..then spend the $$$$

if you knew what you were doing you wouldnt have asked the hardware question in the first place.

if you wish me banned, Im sure there is a request form around here somewhere :wave: good luck with that.

AAR.oner
2009-01-05, 12:20 PM
if you wish me banned, Im sure there is a request form around here somewhere :wave: good luck with that.

http://bbs.chinadaily.com.cn/attachments/month_0802/T-Shirt-Next-on-the-Banned-List-789925_76X0NaZPUCr6.jpg



:cool:

GRC
2009-01-05, 12:38 PM
I'm not saying what your using is bad or wrong, but for the degree of editing I do, I couldn't make due with what the alesis has to offer

I'm working on a show right now and there are a few, maybe 4 instances where the volume spikes intensly. There are multiple left and right channel dropouts that need spliced/patched, and I have to crossfade 4 tape flips. It needs a good eq, some light compression, and the stereo image needs centered and widened. With all of these, I used a phase scope, and FFT meter, and a spectral meter in the audio montage utility of wavelab. I fix in montage, set my plugs, do one render and it's totally cleaned up. I also have the luxury of the undo button where your tweaks are in the transfer and permanent. If you don't like it after your done, your stuck doing another transfer. I can render and undo 10 times in the same time span it would take you to retransfer if I needed to with no ill effect to the files or tapes ect ect.

Not sure how using the alesis would be better (for me) than using a cheaper korg MR-1 that can double as a field recorder, and transfers in DSD coupled with wavelab and UAD cards for my needs.

If you want to d a down and dirty EQ then be done, the alesis looks great. I guess it just depends on what degree you want to go to. Just laying all the options on the table :)

Agree, faced with the type of process you're outlining above, the Alesis lacks some of these capabilities; it won't fix a single-channel dropout, as the crop facility crops both channels at once. EQ, limiting, normalization and compression it will do, but widening or centering/moving the stereo stage; not.

I disagree that I would need to 'retransfer' if I didn't like what I'd applied to one track; My approach would be transfer cassette, then make a copy of the transferred track on the HDD, and if needed revert to the copy as the 'raw' transfer.... But I'm coming at it from a different angle to you; most of what I transfer is the tapes I recorded myself over the years; which generally have consistent levels, have been in good storage and are free from dropouts etc. Most of my transfers are just a case of "transfer tape to Alesis; make track splits; fade at any tape flips; join/fade any split tracks over the tape flips; normalize to peak level" and I'm done. Generally no EQ, limiting, compression or anything.

Yup, I agree it looks as though you need something more than the Alesis offers; but it might still be a good option for the OP. If his tapes are free from major defects such as the volume spikes, etc.....

GRC
2009-01-05, 12:46 PM
Hey Thanx,
l already got that one figured out.
l was looking for away to make a
"high quality" recording of my cassettes.
l know that on some of my recordings,
l would want to turn the volume up at least.
Others could use some more bass, and maybe
the "flip" deleted when recording to CD.
l know they make cards with software included for
this purpose, just not sure wich way to go?
Would most likley want to have an EQ also.

Thank You for your reply,
and good luck in the new year!

All easily accomplished with the Alesis.

Last one - the Alesis boots up in 5 seconds - PC's don't !!!

Last one again - I have NO commercial link with Alesis. I just like their product, and use it almost every day.

zeek
2009-01-05, 01:06 PM
I disagree that I would need to 'retransfer' if I didn't like what I'd applied to one track; My approach would be transfer cassette, then make a copy of the transferred track on the HDD, and if needed revert to the copy as the 'raw' transfer.... But I'm coming at it from a different angle to you; most of what I transfer is the tapes I recorded myself over the years; which generally have consistent levels, have been in good storage and are free from dropouts etc. Most of my transfers are just a case of "transfer tape to Alesis; make track splits; fade at any tape flips; join/fade any split tracks over the tape flips; normalize to peak level" and I'm done. Generally no EQ, limiting, compression or anything.



I can see where that would work just fine for what you do. Some of the tapes I'm transferring are from 78 and certainly have a little wear and tear. I just can't think of too many tapes the I don't balance spots on the left and right channels independantly, of fix drop outs or something. I agree, I'm prolly a lil OCD there so some may not go to the trouble. I would rather do more surgical edits on particular pieces rather than do sweeping changes to the whole file. just a matter of preference:)

As for the 1/8" jack input. I've used a good set of balanced cables to go from my cr-5a to my edirol r-09HR and then did the same transfer from the cr-5A to my tascam HD-P2 and the difference was very minimal, if at all. I didn't get real in depth with it. Are there any comparisons done per cable connect type and audio loss anywhere? It is one point I toil with when I think about making the purchase. I would really like to go DSD without having to spend 1000 on the MR-1000

Some flaws are to be expected, Not saying it's without issues, but so far, I would still consider getting one, just to play with and probably will at some point. The tascam HD-P2 I can tell you is tried and proven as is the MR-1000.

bot
2009-01-05, 04:43 PM
your tapes sound really important.

dont be a cheap bastard, get a C|24 (http://www.digidesign.com/index.cfm?langid=100&itemid=5342)

Five
2009-01-05, 04:52 PM
bah! Neve strips are the only way to fly ;) ;) :lmao:

GRC
2009-01-05, 06:15 PM
your tapes sound really important.

dont be a cheap bastard, get a C|24 (http://www.digidesign.com/index.cfm?langid=100&itemid=5342)

Oh, for goodness' sake.... he only needs 2 channels.

mbself
2009-01-06, 12:49 AM
for questionable (yet usable for personal purposes) quality use your deck plus your computer's internal audio card for free

for good quality use you deck+ m-audio pci interface for about $180

for better results use your deck+RME Hammerfall card for about $550

for best results use your deck+dedicated audio workstation and hours of time in post production for whatever you would care to spend

for professional results hire a professional for whatever he charges


I do all of my transfers with my trusty Tascam US-428......good enough for me. I have used my friends project studio with high-end pre's and pre-sonus firewire interface, Pro Tools.....the works. Honestly, for cassettes quality recordings, I can hear the difference but I can't swear that i could tell which was which if I listened blind. I would know they were different and might be able to pick which sounded somewhat better, but would never be able to identify how it was captured between those two without looking.

With a competent capture on respectably decent equipment you can at least have the digital files stored away until you have time to do the post-production yourself.

Be very organized with capturing, logging and labeling each and every recording. Having a bunch of poorly/mislabeled recordings in your hard drive is as bad as having a pile of 1000 cassettes awaiting transfer. I would backup the raw transfers onto data DVD as kind of a failsafe storage archive. Make sure your workstation is comfortable....this could take a while.

Five
2009-01-06, 04:22 AM
^good tips

if somebody reading this decides to use their internal card I found it helps to turn off the monitor during the transfer! (at least it did on my old computer the last time I tried this).

even a $20 SoundBlaster is better than the built-into-the-motherboard type fwiw

dorrcoq
2009-01-06, 04:09 PM
Unless these are master cassettes, I'm assuming a lot will already have been digitized by someone else somewhere down the line, so you can probably avoid doing "thousands".

Personally I play the cassettes on my Nak into my Edirol R-09, then transfer the file to the computer via USB. So, I would also recommend the Korg or other small digital recorder to you. And definitely record in 24 bit, gives you more room to edit and boost levels if needed,

harpsichord
2009-01-06, 04:16 PM
It's great that some people go to such lengths to capture old cassette recordings and digitize them, even better when they share the results with the class, but I have to wonder just how much better all this equipment can make a cassette sound.

I've done a few tape-to-computer transfers using my SoundBlaster card, nothing fancy, just to preserve material I could no longer find. I just question the end benefit of thousands of dollars worth of hardware and dozens of hours of effort to significantly improve on a $3 tape.

Still, this was an interesting and enlightening thread.

GRC
2009-01-06, 04:44 PM
The tape may only cost 3 bucks, but the rarity & value of what's ON the tape, and the archiving effort commensurate with that assessment, can only be judged by those who have the tape and want to preserve it.

Five
2009-01-06, 05:05 PM
It's great that some people go to such lengths to capture old cassette recordings and digitize them, even better when they share the results with the class, but I have to wonder just how much better all this equipment can make a cassette sound.

I've done a few tape-to-computer transfers using my SoundBlaster card, nothing fancy, just to preserve material I could no longer find. I just question the end benefit of thousands of dollars worth of hardware and dozens of hours of effort to significantly improve on a $3 tape.

Still, this was an interesting and enlightening thread.
upgrading to a $120ish soundcard (edirol, e-mu, m-audio) from a stock soundcard or lowend SB will give enough improvement to impress anybody. moving up from there to a $5,000 tascam field recorder... more subtle!

also noteworthy is that while Naks still cost a fortune, highend consumer cassette decks that used to cost $400+ are now on eBay for $15 or so.

I think it is worthwhile to upgrade at least this far!

harpsichord
2009-01-06, 06:06 PM
The tape may only cost 3 bucks, but the rarity & value of what's ON the tape, and the archiving effort commensurate with that assessment, can only be judged by those who have the tape and want to preserve it.

I understand that, and agree with that sentiment. I only question the 'diminishing returns' generated by the expensive options. Is a $2000 Tascam THAT much better than a $700 Alesis or a $200 capture card, when they're all limited by the quality of the source media?

Is the difference in the ears, or in the 'head'?

zeek
2009-01-06, 06:22 PM
The HD-P2 can be bought for under $500 used, I think it sells for $800 new or somewhere in the ballpark. It's not far off from the alesis and doubles as a field recorder.

I did a few tests when I first got the hd-p2
I ran nak cr-5a > emu 1212M vs a cr-5a > HD-P2

I can definetly hear a difference for sure. Now keep in mind it's not as big a difference as say going from a crap stock card to a 200 dollar card, but if you want the most you can capture, you get the best you can. There are tons of transfers out there done on mediocre equipment that are just stellar. I just tend to be a lil OCD and like to make that tape transfer as good and as close to the original as I can. It's all about what you feel is required and doing what you can with your budget. If you can afford the high end, why not do it. If you can't work to at least get good stuff. Two of my Naks I got for free on craigslist :)

If you ever want to do a comparison, transfer a tape on your equipment, then send it to me and I'll transfer on mine. We can post samples and see who can pick what sample came from what lineage. Would be a fun experiment. I would be curious to see myself

mbself
2009-01-06, 06:40 PM
One thing to keep in mind is that the person who does it for a living is going to see things differently than someone who is a hobbyist or is trying to save a buck. I have learned a lot about audio transfers from this site and sites like it. I have learned a lot on my on through trial and error. I know more about it than most of my friends in the real world. I know less about it than most of my friends here in the "not real world".

If someone who paints homes for a living were to see me use my walmart nylon bristled paint brush to paint some base molding in my bedroom they would look at me like i was crazy and insist that I need a $40 Purdy from Home Depot.

If a carpenter saw me use my $15 black and decker hammer they would insist that I use the $80 Estwing with anti-shock grip and vibration absorbing tuned blah, blah blah......

The point is they are your masters....you know what they are worth in time, money and effort. I think you have a good sampling of equipment, techniques and budgets represented in this forum. But, if you have an uncirculated zeppelin show....lets find someone who really knows what they are doing. I:D

mauserman
2009-01-06, 08:29 PM
You hit the nail on the head! l'm the carpenter guy, (31 years), and no l do not know what l'm doing. (Can barley type this!) But l have been collecting for my whole life. When l pull out an old tape, not only do l hear it, but l see my past, my good friends, and good times also. Maybe some people cannot understand, or just think they can, but it's not always been so easy to exchange music. l've sat for hours in parking lots, or camp grounds, dirt fields etc, (with junk boom boxes and dying batteries), to get the stuff l got. (Actually went car to car asking if l could buy, or trade for batteries out of peoples flashlights so l could record side B! Got the batteries cause l had the stuff to trade! hehe)! l intend to preserve what l got the best l can. l am aware that l have a lot of work to do to get it right, and it will probably take me years to even get close, (if l ever do). l'm the guy my old friends look to and ask if l still got that "one tape from that night that we got from that one dude and that weird chick". l wanna say, "hell yea bro, here it is on CD"! Even after transferring to digital, l do not think l could ever throw my tapes away. Someone was right when they stated that it might be all in my head, so what else is there really? Without flashbacks, l'd have no memory at all! l think l am going with the Alesis, or a high end sound card. can hear the difference between the tape played in my Nak while recording, then replayed on my hd after. (Using the mic jack on a SB Live Value). Am going to research the sound cards mentioned here. Also, is there something easier and more robust than Audacity? l'm having a hard time with it.

mauserman

zeek
2009-01-06, 08:39 PM
:)

search for a try before you buy version of wavelab 5. I've tried a few programs and keep coming back to it. Wavelab 6 is worth the $ if you like wavelab 5 but I would certainly give it a go. Good luck, once you go to the darkside of transferring and editing, it's all downhill from there :D

dorrcoq
2009-01-06, 10:25 PM
You mind find something more "robust" than Audacity, but you won't likely find anything easier. And the price is right.:)

GRC
2009-01-07, 04:21 AM
... l think l am going with the Alesis ...

Also, is there something easier and more robust than Audacity? l'm having a hard time with it.

I think that's a wise choice.

I had similar issues with the Audacity interface, which is one of the reasons I'm using the Alesis.

GRC
2009-01-07, 04:23 AM
You mind find something more "robust" than Audacity, but you won't likely find anything easier. And the price is right.:)

If Audacity is the 'easy' interface, I'd hate to see the 'difficult' ones.....

GRC
2009-01-07, 04:38 AM
A couple of the issues I had with Audacity -

The 'export as FLAC' option which doesn't export;

http://www.thetradersden.org/forums/showthread.php?t=41175

Audacity permanently outputting 44.1kHz/16-bit when all settings show 96kHz/24-bit...

http://www.thetradersden.org/forums/showthread.php?t=60812

mauserman
2009-01-07, 07:08 AM
Gonna give Wavelab a go. Trial versions wont let you save your work however.
Maybe can get a feel for it tho. Pretty spendy too.
Thanks,
mauserman

direwolf-pgh
2009-01-07, 11:50 AM
super awesome!

Black Dog
2009-01-07, 12:43 PM
...... Without flashbacks, l'd have no memory at all!.....

:lol4:

Jerm
2009-01-07, 03:22 PM
For the home user, this is about as EZ as it gets...
http://www.dak.com/Reviews/2020Story.cfm

GRC
2009-01-07, 04:38 PM
For the home user, this is about as EZ as it gets...
http://www.dak.com/Reviews/2020Story.cfm

Phew, those guys can talk.....

The strange thing for me is that they sell it as a 'serious' archiving system WITH a turntable... whereas it strikes me that anyone with serious amounts of vinyl usually has a serious turntable already...........

zeek
2009-01-07, 04:54 PM
I think I saw the ShamWOW guy do an infomercial about that set up :lol:

Five
2009-01-07, 05:10 PM
For the home user, this is about as EZ as it gets...
http://www.dak.com/Reviews/2020Story.cfm

Phew, those guys can talk.....

The strange thing for me is that they sell it as a 'serious' archiving system WITH a turntable... whereas it strikes me that anyone with serious amounts of vinyl usually has a serious turntable already...........
looks like trash! :rolleyes:

mauserman
2009-01-07, 09:45 PM
Hey Blackdog,
Thanks for the link to the Yes stuff.
Yessongs was my 2nd album l ever bought,
(mowed the lawn twice a day for it).
It remains my favorite today.
Maybe just in my head tho, or maybe
because of flashbacks or something.

mauserman