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The Sixth Rat Packer
2008-06-16, 10:05 PM
Okay I had a question that I've wondered for a long time.

Here's a hypothetical question that disregards the legality between ripping your own personal cds to your pc that's come up recently.

Suppose the RIAA raids my place, and sieze my computer.

They find say 300 (random number) of mp3s on there.

How do they know that I did not own those cds at one point or another, and ripped them to the HD?

If you go into Itunes and edit the mp3 tags by higlighting all the files and clicking "GET INFO" and in that section where it usually may or may not have information pertaining to a ripping group or whatever, you just blank it out or type "personal backups" or whatever, does that eliminate any identification?

Just wondering.

I mean I don't use torrents except for here, and I don't use p2p type programs like Kazaa, Morpheous, Limewire or any of that either, so I don't run into the "sharing" aspect.

But I always wondered what stopped these kids who got busted from just saying "these are all my personal rips, but I lost my phsyical stash in a move at one point, or something like that.

As long as they don't have shit that's like has the ripping group's name in the title of the folder, or something. :lol4:

I dunno. Figured I'd ask others what their thoughts on this was.

Al FS
2008-06-16, 10:24 PM
If you have no proof though, it could go either way depending on the jury/judge.

But doesn't the "fair use" doctrine protect that anyway. I heard it said that if there's no money involved... it's ok. (which is odd as shit)

I'm kinda curious myself. (Not that I'll try it lol)

The Sixth Rat Packer
2008-06-16, 11:59 PM
I was meaning more along the lines of them being able to analyze the MP3 and being able to tell whether it was from a retail disc or if it was something else.

As I type that I feel like an idiot because it sounds stupid, but I always wondered why someone couldn't just say "these are all my own backups, but I lost the physical cds. Good thing I backed them up, eh?" lol

rspencer
2008-06-17, 12:14 AM
They claim that the license purchased with the CD does NOT cover you ripping it & converting to mp3, so any ID of the mp3 is unnecessary.

Those cases I've read the most about, it seems the bust was based on the download traffic, & after warrants were served, on the amount stored on the HD.

snerppy
2008-06-17, 12:36 AM
It's my understanding don't have your cd music in a folder that can be shared in peer to peer groups. If they get your computer they can only charge you with the music that is from cd's that is being shared with others. I hope that helps.

The Sixth Rat Packer
2008-06-17, 12:58 AM
It's my understanding don't have your cd music in a folder that can be shared in peer to peer groups. If they get your computer they can only charge you with the music that is from cd's that is being shared with others. I hope that helps.

Yeah that case boiled down to not the fact that it was ripped (although the RIAA tried that one) to the HD but because it was being shared.

And they want you to buy them via Itunes/Amazon.com in the MP3 format, that's why they did that.

By you ripping your storebought CDS and putting them on the Ipod, it's taking mp3 money away from them.

Stupid, I agree, but that's their "logic" in all it's fractured glory

splumer
2008-06-17, 08:54 AM
Actually, there was just something on NPR about this just a few days ago. "Format conversion" is generally regarded as fair use. Back in the old days, one would buy an LP and tape it onto a cassette (or even 8-track) to listen to in one's car or portable. Those usually sounded better than pre-recorded tapes anyway. When the cassette really took off in the '70s, the RIAA howled about how home taping would kill the music business (all the more reason to do it, IMHO) and tried to get it banned, a tax on cassettes that would go to them, etc. The Supreme Court told them to get stuffed, and said only an idiot would but the LP and the cassette or 8-track version if there was no substantial difference.

It's no different now. I have tons of CD's that simply aren't available on iTunes or anywhere else (nudge nudge, wink wink) so the only way I'd be able to get them on my portable player - if I had one - would be to rip them. Or, what I usually do for parties is create a playlist in Media Player on my laptop, hook it up to my stereo, and then I have 8 hours or more of music that I don't have to fuss with. There's just no way of doing that without format conversion.

In your case, Pack, they'd have to prove wrongdoing by showing how your mp3's were ill-gotten, from burned CD copies of legit releases or illegally downloaded. You wouldn't be bound to prove your innocence, only to refute the evidence presented against you, assuming it was a criminal trial. They have no way of knowing when or if you ever owned the CD's in question, though I suppose to keep it legal, if you were to get rid of the CD's, you should also get rid of any copies you had.

So, it all falls into fair use. What I'm really surprised at, though, is that the RIAA hasn't flooded the P2P networks with incomplete, crappy-sounding mp3's (well, more so than they already are) to turn people off to the P2p networks and encourage them to get their downloads legally. Or maybe they have already.

classicrock1169
2008-06-17, 11:33 AM
I understand ok...... you could say that those mp3s were yours and that you just lost your physical cd as long as you aren't sharing them on limewire or something then it is illegal. Technically the tunes could be downloaded off of limewire as long as THEY don't know about it. As long as you don't share it. After you download something in limewire right click and then press stop sharing or something along those lines. Anyways I am firmly against file sharing music. If you like the artists so much they buy there cd and support them. They can't make new music if you aren't buying there albums. I also like physical cds.

The Sixth Rat Packer
2008-06-17, 11:42 AM
I understand ok...... you could say that those mp3s were yours and that you just lost your physical cd as long as you aren't sharing them on limewire or something then it is illegal. Technically the tunes could be downloaded off of limewire as long as THEY don't know about it. As long as you don't share it. After you download something in limewire right click and then press stop sharing or something along those lines. Anyways I am firmly against file sharing music. If you like the artists so much they buy there cd and support them. They can't make new music if you aren't buying there albums. I also like physical cds.

In the past I've been a heavy downloader of music. Not via peer sharing, but via Rapidshare boards, and whatnot.

I've had in excess of 200 gigs at one time before.

Now I've shunned my evil ways, and am attempting to go legit. Very difficult, I might add.

I've cut my collection down to only music that I have personally bought and ripped, or were available for free downloads/internet only releases such as Saul Williams, Radiohead, NIN, and so on. Those bands had their latest albums up for like 5 dollars or free, your choice. I paid for the Saul Williams (several copies, actually in various formats) and I got the others for free.

And I've got several DJ Mixtapes by DJ's that I know so I have those as well, in addition to some neo soul/funk/hip hop radio podcasts that were free from www.wefunkradio.com


Just now getting into the Amazon.com mp3 downloading thing. I bought my first album the other day (yay!) by Wayman Tisdale called "Rebound" (just came out) and am going to start buying more regularly from them.

My only issue is that there's a lot I want but they don't have, and it makes no sense why they don't have it.

Like, for instance, Damien Rice's "O". His debut album, and most popular one.

They don't have it, and neither does Itunes. But they have "9" and Live @<hidden> Union Chapel (or whatever it's called).

There's some single MP3's they don't have either, namely specific remixes.

They don't have Craig David's first album, but they have all his other albums.

Frustrating, but I'm staying the course! lol

AAR.oner
2008-06-17, 07:09 PM
there are record stores, many of which sell online, where you can find just about any recording thats out there, no matter how rare or OOP it might be...and they're lossless as well! i know it sounds old skool and passe at this point, but you could always give it a go ;)

as for funk/hip hop/remix related ish, might i recommend turntablelab.com & thegiantpeach.com for starters